What Is a Personal Injury Lawsuit? 5 Main Types of Personal Injuries

personal injury lawsuit

We all know it in the back of our minds: injuries and accidents happen, we’re just waiting for the next time they happen to us. It’s bad enough when an accident is inevitable, but when it occurs because of someone else’s negligence, you shouldn’t be left to foot the bill.

That’s why personal injury cases are so common today. They give you an opportunity to hold the person accountable while minimizing the damage you have to suffer.

Although every case is unique, they all boil down to a few top categories and types of personal injuries.

1. Car Accident Cases

Every year, there are 2.35 million people injured in vehicle accidents in the US alone. Many of these injuries are mild, but some of them are life-changing.

In a car accident lawsuit, you need to prove that the other driver was at fault or mostly at fault for the collision. You also need to be able to prove your injuries and damages.

It’s important to recognize that your settlement isn’t only meant to cover the costs you’ve already incurred. You need to consider the future repercussions of your injuries too.

For instance, you may need ongoing physical therapy or even home nursing care. If your future career prospects are damaged or ended because of your injury, you should be suing for that loss as well.

2. Medical Malpractice Cases

To many victims, medical malpractice cases are especially emotional. After all, you put your trust in a medical professional, and when they are reckless with your health, it feels like a betrayal.

With a medical malpractice case, one of the most critical challenges is proving that the provider failed to meet the minimum standard of care.

For instance, there are known risks to certain procedures and medications. If you happen to have complications despite the doctor taking all the necessary precautions, you wouldn’t win a malpractice suit.

Instead, these lawsuits are meant for cases when doctors fail to meet their minimum requirements. For instance, if a surgeon doesn’t sterilize their equipment properly and it causes an infection, you’re likely to win that lawsuit.

3. Assault, Battery, Other Intentional Injuries

Most of the time with vehicle accidents and medical malpractice cases, the person who injured you is being reckless and neglectful. They aren’t necessarily injuring you on purpose.

Assault, battery, and other intentional injury cases are different. The person actively chose to do harm to you rather than just choosing to take risks with your safety.

For this reason, plaintiffs in these cases are more likely to receive damages above and beyond their financial losses. That could include pain and suffering payments or punitive damages. If you aren’t familiar with the term, punitive damages are meant to be punishment for a defendant’s actions.

In these types of personal injury cases, the more documentation you have, the better. This is one of several reasons why it’s important to file a police report when an assault or battery occurs. Police reports are viewed as highly reliable evidence rather than he-said-she-said stories from the people involved.

4. Slip and Fall or Premises Injury Cases

Personal injury cases don’t always deal with a person’s actions in the moment an incident happens. Sometimes the problem is that the person didn’t take preventative measures to keep you safe before the incident occurred.

Premises injuries like slip and fall cases are prime examples of this.

Any property owner has a responsibility to take precautions to make their property safe for visitors. That includes commercial properties like stores and restaurants.

A slip and fall case is exactly what it sounds like. You’re on someone else’s property and you injure yourself because they didn’t take precautions like mopping up a spill.

However, you may also be able to sue a property owner due to their failure to protect you from crime.

For example, you’re leaving a restaurant late at night. Thanks to a lack of lighting or security in the parking lot, it attracts criminals and they rob you. You can seek damages from the property owner for failing to take precautions against a known risk.

5. Dog Bite Cases

This category might seem specific but it’s surprisingly common. As much as every pet parent loves their furry friends, there is always a risk involved.

As far as the law is concerned, a pet owner is liable for any damage or injury their pet causes. It varies from state to state, but in Wisconsin, owners are liable for the cost of any dog bite or other injuries their pets cause.

In some cases, the damages can be more extreme. If an owner knows their dog has bitten someone in the past and the dog bites someone again, the owner may need to pay double the financial damages to the second victim.

This is meant to force dog owners to take more responsibility if their pet is known to be aggressive. While any dog can bite at any time, owners need to take extra precautions if they know their dog has this tendency.

As with other injuries, you may be able to receive damages for future consequences of a dog bite. For instance, perhaps the bite scarred you and you need reconstructive surgery for the scar. You can seek damages to pay for that surgery.

Understanding the Types of Personal Injuries for Your Case

In all types of personal injury lawsuits, one of the biggest problems for plaintiffs is a lack of knowledge. Some people don’t bring a lawsuit at all even if they deserve compensation because they worry about the process and the hassle or they don’t realize they have a case.

While it helps to have a basic understanding of the types of personal injuries, your next step is to hire a lawyer who can take the case off your hands. To find out if you have a case, call our personal injury attorneys today.

Motorcycle Accidents: An After the Accident Checklist

motorcycle accidents

The aftermath of a motorcycle accident can be quite traumatic. In a moment, a motorcyclist can go from enjoying the ride to dealing with the pain of injuries and serious damage to the bike.

In the midst of dealing with both of those motorcycle accident problems, there are also future legal proceedings to keep in mind—which can be incredibly difficult at a chaotic accident scene. In addition to medical bills and bike repair, pedestrians may also receive compensation for lost wages and pain and suffering resulting from a motorcycle accident. This checklist can help any motorcyclist get through the moments, days, and years after a motorcycle accident (and receive fair compensation).

What To Do After a Motorcycle Accident

___ Stay in the same spot (safely).
If it is possible to say safe doing so, try to stay in the same place after an accident (the bike too). The placement of the bike and all parties involved can be an important part of determining fault.

___ Call the police.
As soon as possible, contact the police. While waiting for them to arrive, don’t make any statements to the other involved parties or bystanders. Even small statements, such as “I don’t know what happened” or “I shouldn’t have…” can be misunderstood as an admission of fault.

___ Collect photos and information.
While at the accident scene, collect as much information as possible. Motorcyclists should collect insurance and contact information from other parties involved and bystanders. In addition, motorcyclists should take photos of the scene, nearby buildings and landmarks, injuries, and motorcycle damage.

___ Seek medical care.
Some accidents are visible and obvious, requiring immediate medical attention. Other accident injuries are not as evident right away and may take days for symptoms to appear. No matter what the type of injury, motorcyclists should always seek medical care as soon as it is obvious there is a problem. This could include a ride in the ambulance at the scene or a visit to a clinic days after. Motorcyclists should always keep all documentation (i.e. medical and bills) from the appointments for later reference.

___ Keep all motorcycle accident documentation on file.
After a motorcycle accident, motorcyclists receive documentation for bike repair, hospital and clinic care, chiropractor appointments, insurance matters, and any other accident matters. Even receipts for medications can be helpful when seeking compensation for injuries from a motorcycle accident. All of this paperwork can be an important part of future communications and proceedings.

___ Contact the insurance company.
Motorcyclists should always contact the insurance company that covers the bike, but should always keep in mind that communications are not confidential. As in all statements at the scene, motorcyclists should not admit fault to insurance agents and representatives.

___ Talk to an experienced lawyer.
After many motorcycle accidents, motorcyclists may receive offers from insurance companies that may not cover all the expenses caused by the accident. Even if the initial offer sounds fair, it can still make sense for a motorcyclist to  contact an experienced local lawyer to get information about compensation specific to the case and  Wisconsin shared fault law, which means that the fault of each driver is calculated and parties are responsible for their share of the expenses. An experienced personal injury lawyer can give you advice on how to proceed to receive fair compensation.

How to Prevent Future Motorcycle Accidents

  • Wear visible motorcycling gear (including bright clothing and a helmet reflector).
  • Make sure other drivers see you when driving.
  • Don’t drink and ride.
  • Drive safely.
  • Wear safety gear when riding (including a helmet, goggles or helmet shield, long sleeve jacket, long pants, and motorcycle boots).
  • Purchase a quality helmet.
  • Pay attention to the weather before and during riding.
  • Watch the road closely for sand, potholes, and excessive gravel that can cause an accident.
  • Take a  Wisconsin motorcycle safety course.
  • Look twice at intersections, proceed once.
  • Most importantly, drive safe and enjoy the ride!


The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

When to Contact & Hire a Personal Injury Lawyer

when to hire a personal injury lawyers

Personal injury lawyers are more than just car accident lawyers. In fact, it is wise to contact and hire a personal injury lawyers for any case involving an injury resulting from a negligent or reckless action of another party. This can be any kind of incident (see list of possible personal injury cases) where someone is injured and needs compensation to cover any expenses that arise—and may continue to arise—related to the injury.

All personal injury accident victims should consult with an experienced personal injury lawyer.

What kind of cases do personal injury lawyers handle?

Most people think of personal injury lawyers after a car accident. The list of personal injury cases could include, but is not limited to:

  • Bicycle Accidents
  • Car, Truck and Automobile Accidents
  • Motorcycle Accidents
  • Boat and Personal Watercraft Accidents
  • Bus, Semi-Truck and Other Vehicle Accidents
  • Slip and Fall Accidents
  • Dog Bites and Animal Attacks
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Spinal Cord Injury
  • Pedestrian Accidents
  • Farm Accidents
  • Construction Accidents
  • Workplace Accidents and Worker’s Compensation
  • Defective Products and Product Liability
  • Wrongful Death
  • Insurance Claims
  • Nursing Home Abuse
  • Broken Bones
  • Homeowner Liability
  • Medical Malpractice

An experienced personal injury lawyer is an important asset and guide when navigating through the process. The right personal injury lawyer can answer questions and advocate for the highest and fairest amount of compensation.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

“I’ve been in a bike accident! What do I do now?”

biker getting ready for a ride on the roadIt’s the perfect time of year to take a bike ride, and cyclists across Wisconsin are seizing the opportunity. If you’re one of them, chances are that you’ve had numerous close calls with drivers who were driving too fast or not paying attention. Sometimes those run-ins turn into a bike versus car accident, it can be hard to know what to do—and a bicycle accident can feel very different from any car accident you’ve been involved in.

While a bike accident may be different, the consequences of the accident can be similar—and some serious consequences may not show up immediately, such as a serious injury. A bike-car accident can result in lawsuits and legal action, making it imperative to take the necessary steps to protect yourself after an accident.

Take photos.

If you have a phone or camera, take as many photos as possible. Take pictures of the damage (to your bike, vehicle, clothing, and helmet), car license plate, any skid marks or landmarks, the accident scene, and any injuries. While you wait for the police to arrive, do not say anything to bystanders or the other person involved in the accident, except to collect contact and insurance information.

Make a statement.

While you shouldn’t say anything to other people on the scene, make sure that you do make a statement to the police officer on scene. Tell the police officer all details about the accident, including any injuries that you may have (even minor ones). Once the report is filed, request a copy for your records. Seek medical attention for any injuries stemming from the accident; be aware that not all injuries show up right away. Some injuries can take hours to show up or can progress from a minor condition to serious over time.

Save all documentation.

Start a file with all documentation related to the accident: photos, police report, contact information. Write down a full and complete recollection of the accident (even the most minor details), as well as information about any pain or injuries that present themselves after the accident.

Consult a lawyer.

Because it can take time to resolve issues that arise from a bicycle accident, don’t make a statement to the other motorist’s insurance company until you have contacted a local and experienced lawyer. Make sure you bring all documentation to the meeting so the lawyer gets a full picture of the situation—and you can get to the final step of a satisfactory resolution.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.