5 Essential Tips to Have in Mind When Looking for a Corporate Lawyer to Represent Your Business

Business attorney

As a business owner, you need to have a business attorney to represent you in times of need. Troubles with a contract, employee problems, and customer claims are just a few reasons why a business lawyer is an essential part of your team.

Because of their importance, hiring a business lawyer is a task that shouldn’t be taken lightly. A simple search on your internet browser can lead you to many local business lawyers, but you don’t want to hire anyone you come across. 

You need to ensure that the attorney you decide to hire is one who will represent you when needed and provide you with excellent service as someone you can trust for years to come. Continue reading below for a few secrets on how to find the right attorney for you and your business!

Here’s everything you need to know about finding someone who’ll be the best fit!

1. Request a Consultation

If you believe you’ve found a lawyer that you like, request a consultation before making a final decision. When you sit down with him or her, this is the time to figure out as much about him or her as possible. Get to know the attorney’s personality and if it goes well with yours and your business.

Use this time wisely. Ask all questions you have and give full details about your business and what you expect from the attorney. 

Then, allow the attorney to explain how he or she will provide you with your business needs and how he or she will meet these expectations. Ask what the process for attorney and clients is as well. 

It’s a good idea to ask about the cost of this consultation before the meeting, so you know what to expect.

2. Ask for Recommendations 

If you’re having a hard time finding a lawyer or two to schedule a consultation with, then begin asking friends and family members for recommendations. There’s a good chance that someone you know knows a good attorney that is well respected in your area.

As a business owner, you most likely have a few business partners or business friends. If this is the case, then be sure to ask them what attorney they work with as well. 

Choosing someone who has a good reputation with your business friends gives you peace of mind knowing that you’re making a solid decision. 

3. Research Their Experience 

Having a few recommendations from friends is a great starting point. You should do some of your own research as well. Take the time to do an online search to research in-depth the attorneys that you’ve selected.

How much experience does each attorney have? Aside from years of general experience, how many years of local experience does each attorney have? 

You should try to find someone who has plenty of experience working in the area where your business is located. Each state and city has its own guidelines, laws, and regulations for businesses. 

You’ll want to hire someone who is familiar with all of these specifics. 

4. Ask for Referrals 

Another great thing to ask from the attorney is for referrals. If he or she is a reputable attorney, then he or she will have several referrals to offer you. Once the attorney gives you a few referrals, be sure to reach out to these past clients. 

Call each referral and ask them questions about their own experience with the attorney. Learn about all the good the attorney has done for them and even some of the not-so-great experiences. 

5. Assess Different Fees 

The fees that an attorney charges shouldn’t be the only determining factor you use to decide who you’ll choose. There are great attorneys who charge hefty fees and great attorneys who charge much smaller fees. 

What you need to be aware of, however, is that not all attorneys are great attorneys. Don’t let the price of one sway you in a certain direction without doing the rest of your research first. Once you have a few great attorneys narrowed done, you can then use their fees to determine which one is a better fit for you. 

6. Locate a Local Attorney

Locating a local attorney is important because this will be someone who knows about the area and other local businesses as well. Think about what legal needs your business has. A local attorney should know how to handle these legal needs in the area where your business is located. 

Choosing someone who’s local also helps when it’s time to set up a consultation. It also helps when it’s time to meet up with your attorney in person for future meetings as well. A local attorney might also have strong relationships with local officials and courthouses. 

All of these factors can come in handy when it’s time for the attorney to defend you in a case. You can access local lawyer directories to ensure you’re only shifting through attorneys that are local. 

Do You Need an Experienced Business Attorney? 

If you’re a business owner, then you need to hire an experienced business attorney who can be by your side during your most crucial times of need. 

You never know when you might be faced with difficult times and in need of an amazing, experienced, local attorney who you can trust.

Click here to contact us today to see how we can help you with all your legal business needs!

What type of business entity should I choose?

person signing a document for starting a businessStarting a new business is a process with an extensive amount of decisions. One of the most important decisions for any new business owner, choosing the business entity when incorporating, is more abstract, but has significant legal and financial implications for the future. Specifically, the type of business entity determines required documentation and tax payments, specifics of the resolution of liability issues, and whether raising money is possible.

With so much at stake, settling on the right business structure is a decision that should be made after much thought and advice. This article is not meant to give the latter, only to inform potential business owners of the basic types of business. For expertise specific to the situation, contact a local lawyer that can assist with the decision, filing the correct paperwork, and any other best-laid practices that can prevent serious issues.  

Sole Proprietor

A sole proprietor business structure is the picture that most people associate with a business. The business owner manages all daily operations, assets, and liabilities. Under this business structure, the owner is personally responsible for all liabilities. Sole proprietor businesses are appropriate for many different kinds of businesses, including service-oriented and at-home businesses.

Partnership

A partnership is a business structure with multiple owners. Because there are multiple partners, the profits, taxes, and liabilities are shared. With several owners, the partners are all personally responsible for liabilities. Practically, this business structure is ideal because owners can share the workload, benefits of business services (i.e. marketing, operational needs, supply purchasing, etc.) and contribute individual expertise.

Limited Liability Company

A LLC is right for company owners who want to limit their personal responsibility for liabilities (plus other advantages and disadvantages which can be discussed with a lawyer or business adviser). Often, a limited liability company is comprised of different owners with differing amounts of investment. If an owner wants to leave the company, they are only responsible for the amount invested.

Corporation

A corporation is an entity that is formed and taxed. Managers are not personally responsible for the liabilities, though a corporation can be expensive to form. A corporation can be funded by a pool of investors and run by directors. Because of the entity structure, extensive records are required and the profits are distributed to investors.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.