4 Helpful Tips for Dads On Fathers’ Rights & Child Support

Dad giving his young son piggy back ride as they both laugh with pleasure and enjoyment, low angle against a clear blue summer sky after child support and custodyIf you’ve watched the news recently, you’ve read the article about the man who the court ordered to pay child support even though the child isn’t biologically his. A quick Google search demonstrates how common of an occurrence this situation is, and how confusing the legal system can be when it comes to dad’s legal rights and obligation to pay child support, especially when they’re not allowed to see the child.  Indeed, we see fathers in our Watertown and Lake Mills offices on a regular basis who are not sure of their legal standing in Wisconsin—or the implications of their decisions regarding child support, custody/placement, and visitation.

Father rights and child supports may seem like a murky subject that can be muddled through, but the ramifications of a wrong step by a father in a Wisconsin court does have serious legal implications (including jail time) and can impact child custody proceedings and a man’s financial future.  Here are a few tips for any dad trying to fulfill their obligation and stay out of legal hot water when it comes to their rights as a father and child support.

Know your rights as a father.

The rights of fathers—or presumed fathers—vary from state to state, so it’s important to contact a local attorney to find out your rights regarding paternity and child support.  Many attorneys offer free consultations for your first contact, so make sure you use these tips to get the most out of your initial meeting or phone call.

Be careful when stopping child support payments.

Always consult your attorney before you stop payments, such as if you are concerned about the lack of visitation you are receiving.  Most courts hold you accountable for child support even if you are not seeing the child. Failure to make child support payments can land you in legal hot water and even lead to your arrest.

Child custody and child support do not go hand in hand.

Just as a lack of visitation and paying child support are not legally connected, neither is child support and child custody.  Even if you and child’s other parent have joint custody or you have sole custody, child support is still calculated and paid.  When going through child custody proceedings, know these key child custody terms so you can understand what you are getting—and not getting—as you go through the child custody and child support.

The amount of child support is not set in stone.

Your child support obligation is calculated, and can be reviewed and adjusted.  Requesting an adjustment to your child support can increase or decrease the amount, so be aware of this consequence. If you have any questions about child support and your rights, contact your attorney. 

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

Should I contact a lawyer for my traffic ticket?

A fast silver sports car speeding down the road getting a speeding ticketYou were driving a little bit too fast and ended up with a speeding ticket.  You got a ticket for a serious moving violation.  You just arrived home with a reckless driving citation.  Whatever traffic ticket you received, now you’re wondering what the next step is in the legal process.  If you’re like 90% of Americans, you’ll pay the ticket and be automatically convicted of the driving offense.  However, there are situations where hiring a local lawyer may help your case, occupation, driving record, and your insurance premium.

If your job is on the line

For truck drivers, or other workers that need a clean driving record, a traffic ticket can be a serious matter with dire repercussions.  Depending on the offense, you could lose your commercial license temporarily or permanently (and longer than a driver with a regular license without a CDL).  The same could go for your job if you need to operate a vehicle as part of your job duties; that’s when it’s time to contact a local lawyer to find out your options and the feasibility of keeping your driving record clean and your CDL for your employment.

If this isn’t your first serious ticket

A series of tickets in a short time can result in loss of your license.  The exact point of suspension depends on whether you have a probationary or regular license, and whether you have a regular license including a Commercial Driver License (CDL).  If you’re facing the possibility of a loss of driving privileges, you can contact the DMV about a traffic safety course (where you can earn back points) or an occupational license that you can use to get back and forth to necessary destinations (i.e. work, grocery store, etc.) Another option is to contact a lawyer to see if there is a possibility you can plead down the demerit points to an amount that allows you to stay on the road.

If it’s a DUI/OWI

Driving under intoxication, commonly called drunk driving, is a very serious offense—and the consequences get more expensive and dire when you receive a ticket for your second or third DUI.  If you did receive a DUI ticket, consider contacting an attorney (we’ve given you specific reasons to contact a lawyer for your drunk driving ticket here).

There are other reasons to contact a lawyer for your traffic ticket: concern about future insurance premiums, for financial reasons, etc.  The outcome of your case is based on numerous factors, including the location and agency you are negotiating with, so it makes sense to contact a local, experienced attorney for your traffic ticket. When you do, make a list of questions you have about the ticket and your chances of a favorable result (as well as use these tips) to get the most out of your initial consultation and get your case (and hopefully you) on the road to a successful outcome.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.