How can I visit my grandchild? Can I still see my stepchild?

grandparents with children after granted third-party visitation in WisconsinA divorce, death, or separation can be hard on a child—and on everyone involved.  In Wisconsin, parents have primary rights when it comes to custody, allowing them to raise the child as they see fit and determine who they allow to see the child (or children).

For other parties, such as grandparents, stepparents, or anyone else who has been closely involved with a child or children, the right to visitation is not an absolute; that doesn’t mean that non-parents can’t be granted access to the children.  There are certain cases where third-party visitation can be granted by the court, such as paternal grandparent, stepparent, or another person who has had and has continued to try to maintain a close relationship with the child.  Most importantly, the courts must determine that visitation is best for the child.

If you would like to find out if you might be granted third-party visitation, contact a local family lawyer to find out if your situation is in line with previous Wisconsin cases. An experienced family lawyer can give you the information you need to find out if your case is viable, and what you need to do to go forward with your third-party visitation case.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

Can a tenant be evicted during the winter?

rental home in winterIt’s a common question—so common, in fact, that it has been asked in person and even on social media.  The answer is surprising and even counters a very common landlord-tenant myth.

The answer in Wisconsin (or anywhere) is usually yes.  A tenant can be evicted any time of the year, even in the winter.  Be aware there may be special circumstances that may make the answer a no, such as with federally subsidized housing or in the case of elderly housing (consult a lawyer to be sure).  To be clear, that doesn’t mean that tenants can just be moved out spur of the moment, or that a landlord can go into the rental property if the tenants can stop paying.

A landlord cannot legally go into the rental property without usually giving 12-hour notice unless the situation is urgent (i.e. fire, burst pipe, etc.)  Once notice is given, the tenant must allow the landlord to enter.

If a landlord does decide to evict a tenant, legal notices and/or eviction proceedings should be initiated.  Notices must be delivered in person or via a delivery method specified by law.  To make sure the landlord delivers notices correctly and on schedule, contact a lawyer for information. Evicting tenants from your property is a legal process and must be filed in court.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.