Who Needs a Living Trust? Smart Planning Moves for Your Future

who needs a living trust

Only 40 percent of Americans have a will or living trust.

More than half of the population has no legal control or protection over their assets in the event that they die or become incapacitated. Frighteningly, nearly a third of older adults have never even discussed their end-of-life wishes with their families. 

But the entire subject is often a source of confusion. Who needs a living trust? Who can get by with just a will? How do you know which category you fall into? 

Keep reading to learn what a living trust can do for you and if you or a loved one should create a trust as part of your estate planning process.

What Is a Living Trust?

While most people have a decent idea of what a will is and does, many wonder, “What is a living trust?” 

Like a will, a living trust is a legal document that designates control or ownership of one’s assets. Unlike a will, a living trust goes into effect immediately upon creation rather than upon the creator’s death. This means it can be used to:

  • Protect or control assets in the event of dementia or incapacitation  
  • Distribute assets in ways wills cannot 
  • Avoid probate 

Under a living will, an individual legally becomes the “trustee” of his or her own assets.

Types of Trusts

Living trusts should not be confused with testamentary trusts. Living trusts are established and take effect while the creator is alive. Testamentary trusts are created upon an individual’s death in accordance with his or her will. 

There are two kinds of living trusts:

  • Revocable
  • Irrevocable

In revocable trusts, individuals may add to, alter, or dispose of the covered assets at their discretion. 

Under irrevocable trusts, no changes may be made to the covered assets once the trust is established.  

The exact rules over what a trust may cover and how it is structured can vary from state to state.  

Who Can Create a Living Trust?

Anyone with assets of any kind can create a living trust. 

Many people mistakenly believe that only the wealthy need wills or trusts. This is untrue. Even individuals with modest estates benefit from clearly outlining their desires for themselves and their assets via the appropriate legal documents

Primary Benefits of a Living Trust

Individuals questioning “do I need a will or a trust?” often find the decision easier to make when they understand the numerous benefits living trusts can afford them. 

Protection Against Incapacitation

As of 2019, 14 percent of Americans 71 years of age and older have some form of dementia. That number is only expected to increase as the population continues to age. 

Living trusts protect both individuals and their assets in the event that they develop dementia or are otherwise incapacitated. With a living trust, incapacitated individuals can:

  • Restrict access to and control of their finances to the person(s) of their choice
  • Ensure that their assets are used according to their wishes
  • Prevent themselves from being assigned to conservatorship

Creators can also safeguard assets they wish to pass along to their families that might otherwise be sold to fund their care. 

Probate Avoidance 

Probate is a court-led process that typically occurs when an individual dies. It involves the assessment and distribution of the deceased’s assets. 

Whether or not its reputation is deserved, probate exists as something of a nightmare in the public consciousness. Living trusts can place assets outside of probate, thereby sparing survivors the pain and stress of that process. 

Granting Assets to Minors 

Technically, individuals can bequeath assets to minors via their wills. However, in those situations, a court-appointed adult is assigned to control the assets in question. They may continue to control them until the beneficiary is 18 or 21, per state rules. 

Living trusts enable individuals to specify:

  • Who controls the assets until the minor is of age
  • When the minor qualifies to receive their assets (e.g. upon graduation from high school or college)
  • What purposes the assets may be used for (college tuition, a vehicle, housing, etc.)

Secondary Benefits of a Living Trust

Living trusts also offer additional benefits that may be of interest in some situations. 

Pack-Up Plans

Living trusts can also allow creators to implement back-up plans. For instance, one might specify a primary beneficiary for an asset as well as a secondary beneficiary. This can ensure that precious items remain in the family instead of becoming subject to secondary assignment if the first beneficiary dies. 

Privacy

Legal wills become public documents upon an individual’s death. Living trusts remain private, allowing people to mask their finances and decisions from open view.

This can be particularly valuable in situations involving:

  • Large sums of money 
  • Blended or second families 
  • Business assets 

Who Needs a Living Trust?

“Do I need a trust?” is a common question among individuals exploring their estate planning options.

While only you can decide if a living trust is right for you, these guidelines can help you make an informed choice.  

Property Ownership

If you own property that you wish the bequeath to specific members of your family, a trust may be a valuable investment. This is particularly true if:

  • Complicated family dynamics are involved
  • Both primary and secondary requirements are needed
  • Property is owned in multiple locations

Marital and Family Status

Married individuals can often easily pass shared property to their spouses. Unmarried couples may need a living trust to keep property out of probate and bequeath it as desired. 

Trusts can also be important for individuals whose legal next of kin are not willing or able to properly handle their finances in the event the creator dies or is incapacitated. Trusts can designate an alternate, more appropriate party instead. This can be particularly relevant for single individuals who would prefer their assets not be left to parents or siblings who do not share their values.

Age and Health 

Living trusts are especially valuable to individuals who are:

  • Older
  • Of any age but in poor health
  • Recently diagnosed with early-onset or chronic health conditions

Wealth

The more assets you have, the more likely you are to need a living trust.

The types of assets matter, as well. Real estate, businesses, and other legally complicated assets may be a much stronger reason to invest in a living trust than simple net worth. 

Parents or Guardians of Minors

As noted, anyone who wishes to leave assets to minors and have control over how those assets are handled likely needs a living trust. 

How Do I Set up a Trust?

Always seek out a qualified legal professional to assist you in creating a living trust. 

“Why do I need a trust lawyer?” you may ask. “Can’t I write my own using online tools?” 

Although online sites may claim to enable you to quickly and cheaply write your own, this is rarely a good plan. 

  • Trusts must be carefully written to accomplish your goals
  • Exact rules governing trusts vary from state to state
  • Individuals with assets or beneficiaries in different states or countries face extra legal complications 
  • Items you forget to include are not folded into the trust and remain subject to probate

Before meeting with a professional, it can be helpful to make a list of your assets and your preferences about how they should be handled. Is it also important to consider what steps you would want to be taken if you were to become incapacitated. 

Start Planning Your Trust Today

If you read the guidelines on who should have a living trust and saw yourself in them, don’t wait. Now that you know all about who needs a living trust and why contact the experts today and get the help you need to protect yourself and your family. 

Future Financial Security: How to Set Up a Trust Fund in 7 Simple Steps

how to set up a trust fund

In the United States, less than 2% of the population receives a funds by a trust designation. 

Typically trust funds are inherited by the children when a parent dies.  

Passing down your money and property can be a difficult thing to deal with. However, preparing for this step can help you manage where it all goes and how you can help others. 

Continue reading to discover how to set up a trust fund in 7 simple steps! 

1. Choose Your Trust Fund 

There are a variety of trust funds that you will have to choose in the beginning stages of learning how to set up a trust. 

Revocable trusts allow you to control all of the assets and can make changes at any time. Irrevocable trusts happen when you give control of assets to a beneficiary. Other common trusts can be for educational purposes only while others can help people with disabilities.

Think about the purpose of your trust fund during this stage and consider charities during this step.

2. Select a Trustee

The trustee of your trust fund is the person that you will appoint to have power over your assets.

Some people use financial institutions as a trustee. Most people, however, assign a trusted friend or family member as the trustee. Whoever the trustee is, they will have power over your assets. They must be a person that you can rely on to make payments and help others, if necessary. 

If you don’t have a strong relationship with someone or can’t rely on them with basic responsibilities, you should look for another option. Some people use their attorneys to help find a trustee that can pursue your wishes. 

3. Include What’s Necessary

After you have identified the correct type of trust fund for your assets, you must write down a couple of details.

For a trust fund to work, you will need a trust creator, which is typically your role. You will also need to identify the property and assets in the trust along with the beneficiaries. This part will help family members get exactly what you intended them to. 

Throughout all of this, you will need a trustee to administer the entire process. You can take on this role for the remainder of your life or appoint someone else. Typically the person you appoint can only execute your wishes once you’ve passed away or become incapacitated.  

It is important to keep in mind that the distribution of your assets will depend on your spouse and children. 

4. Solidify the Details and Make It Official

Figuring out the details mentioned above may take some time, especially if you have never considered them in the past. 

After you have identified who will get what once you pass on, you will have to make it official. Typically a professional estate or trust attorney delegate this process. Our company has a team of excellent attorneys that can help you in the Wisconsin area. 

Finding a local attorney is crucial because they are well versed in local and state laws. With an attorney by your side, your trust fund can be completed. 

5. Put Away Your Money 

Now that you’ve gotten the details finalized, you can begin putting your money where your mouth is.

For someone to inherit wealth from a trust fund, there must be funds available. You can take your documents to a financial business or trust fund bank account. You can either deposit money into the fund over time or put a lot of money away at once. 

When putting away your money you should also consider your retirement plans. Overlooking retirement may leave you short on money in the future. Talking with your attorney can help you determine the best funding method for your lifestyle. 

6. Register With the IRS

Putting your money into an account will require a bit more documentation.

When you put money into an account, you must register it for tax reasons. Some trust funds that you create will need to have a unique taxpayer identification number. You must have this when filing taxes and taking care of legal work. 

7. Talk With Your Trustee

Throughout the process of setting up a trust fund and even beyond, you should be communicating with your assigned trustee.

Talking with your trustee can help them get a better understanding of your wishes and what you want your assets to go towards. Having an honest relationship is important if you don’t want your money and property to go elsewhere. 

After a death, handling wills and trust fund information can become overwhelming. Talking to your trustee beforehand can also enlighten them as to how the process works and what is expected of them. Helping your trustee along the way is recommended for smooth transitions during tough times.  

Learning How to Set up a Trust Fund Is Easy 

There will come a point in time when your children will inherit your money.

Learning how to set up a trust fund now can ensure that they receive the money and you know exactly where it is going. 

If you have property or money that you want to give to charities or family members, you must appoint a trustee to carry out your wishes. Typically, trustees consist of family members and trusted friends. You should talk to them about what is expected of them and where you want your assets to go. 

Don’t be afraid to get guidance from an attorney. They can help make this process go by quickly and stress-free.  

Be sure to check out our blog and contact us for all of your legal needs in the future! 

Why is a Power of Attorney necessary in Wisconsin?

power of attorney document for parent to sign for a child

A power of attorney is one of the most important parts of estate planning—and one that many Wisconsinites overlook. Many people believe that a will, the most popular estate planning document, is the sole document needed and addresses every situation. The reality is that a Durable Power of Attorney and a Health Care Power of Attorney are two important estate planning documents that make a difficult time easier for a family.

What is a Durable Power of Attorney in Wisconsin?

A Durable Power of Attorney designates a party to act for another person. The Durable Power of Attorney specifies when the designation comes into effect, such as immediately or when the person is incapacitated. The designee may make financial decisions (i.e. pay bills, purchase or sell real estate, etc.), give out gifts, apply for benefits, modify investment and retirement plans, and perform other actions on behalf of another. Because the Durable Power of Attorney gives the designee significant powers, anyone considering the designation should carefully consider who to designate. In some cases, the right designee may be an organization.

What can a Health Care Power of Attorney do?

A Health Care Power of Attorney is another designation that relates specifically to health care decisions. The designee can make decision about the health of another party, especially when a person is incapacitated or incompetent. This estate planning document is also the location where a party can spell out their wishes for health care for the designee. This designation can name the same party who acts as the executor of the will or receives the Durable Power or Attorney designation, or can be a completely different party.

Why is a Power of Attorney important?

A Power of Attorney is invaluable during times when a person is incapacitated or unable to make decisions. If a Durable Power of Attorney is not named in Wisconsin, the family may need to go to court and get a guardian appointed. The process can be expensive and cumbersome during an already difficult period.

The Power of Attorney process can be done independently or as part of the estate planning process with an experienced lawyer. The document should be notarized and can be drafted with broad powers over a person’s affairs or with specific instructions about what powers and when the document goes into effect.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

Dying Without a Will: 4 Things to Know in Wisconsin

dying without a will

When someone dies without a will, the question eventually is asked, “who receives the deceased’s estate?” Wisconsin has  intestacy laws that dictate who receives the deceased’s assets when there is no will. (This is one of the key reasons to draft a will; a person can name beneficiaries to receive assets.) This post highlights key points that family members should know about the situation when a person dies without a will. For information specific to the exact situation, consult an  experienced estate planning lawyer.

The exact distribution of the assets depends on the spouse and descendants.

When a deceased person is survived by a spouse and descendants, it is important to know the difference between community and separate property. Community property applies to assets acquired during the marriage (with a few exceptions). Separate property might include assets acquired before the marriage or by inheritance.

There are several inheritance situations that apply when a deceased’s spouse and children are alive:

  • If there is only a spouse, the probate estate goes to the spouse.
  • If the descendants are the deceased’s and spouse’s, the probate estate goes to the spouse.
  • If the descendants are the deceased’s, but not the deceased’s and spouse’s, the probate estate is split between the spouse and the descendants.

Descendants eligible to receive the deceased’s estate include biological and adopted children. Stepchildren not legally adopted by the deceased and biological children adopted by another party are not included in the estate distribution.

There is a procedure for situations where the deceased is not married.

When the deceased is not married and does not have any descendants, there are two common inheritance situations:

  • If the deceased is survived by their parents, the parents inherit the probate estate.
  • If the deceased is not survived by their parents but is survived by their siblings, the siblings inherit the probate estate.

There are exceptions to these situations, such as if a relative intentionally causes the deceased’s death or does not live 120 hours after the deceased’s death. To see if other exceptions apply, you should speak to an experienced estate planning lawyer.

Some assets may not be included in the estate.

Not all assets are part of the inheritance. If the asset is part of a living trust or is an asset with a named beneficiary, the asset goes to the named beneficiary. Some real estate, 401Ks, and other accounts may not follow intestate succession.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

Motorcycle Accidents: An After the Accident Checklist

motorcycle accidents

The aftermath of a motorcycle accident can be quite traumatic. In a moment, a motorcyclist can go from enjoying the ride to dealing with the pain of injuries and serious damage to the bike.

In the midst of dealing with both of those motorcycle accident problems, there are also future legal proceedings to keep in mind—which can be incredibly difficult at a chaotic accident scene. In addition to medical bills and bike repair, pedestrians may also receive compensation for lost wages and pain and suffering resulting from a motorcycle accident. This checklist can help any motorcyclist get through the moments, days, and years after a motorcycle accident (and receive fair compensation).

What To Do After a Motorcycle Accident

___ Stay in the same spot (safely).
If it is possible to say safe doing so, try to stay in the same place after an accident (the bike too). The placement of the bike and all parties involved can be an important part of determining fault.

___ Call the police.
As soon as possible, contact the police. While waiting for them to arrive, don’t make any statements to the other involved parties or bystanders. Even small statements, such as “I don’t know what happened” or “I shouldn’t have…” can be misunderstood as an admission of fault.

___ Collect photos and information.
While at the accident scene, collect as much information as possible. Motorcyclists should collect insurance and contact information from other parties involved and bystanders. In addition, motorcyclists should take photos of the scene, nearby buildings and landmarks, injuries, and motorcycle damage.

___ Seek medical care.
Some accidents are visible and obvious, requiring immediate medical attention. Other accident injuries are not as evident right away and may take days for symptoms to appear. No matter what the type of injury, motorcyclists should always seek medical care as soon as it is obvious there is a problem. This could include a ride in the ambulance at the scene or a visit to a clinic days after. Motorcyclists should always keep all documentation (i.e. medical and bills) from the appointments for later reference.

___ Keep all motorcycle accident documentation on file.
After a motorcycle accident, motorcyclists receive documentation for bike repair, hospital and clinic care, chiropractor appointments, insurance matters, and any other accident matters. Even receipts for medications can be helpful when seeking compensation for injuries from a motorcycle accident. All of this paperwork can be an important part of future communications and proceedings.

___ Contact the insurance company.
Motorcyclists should always contact the insurance company that covers the bike, but should always keep in mind that communications are not confidential. As in all statements at the scene, motorcyclists should not admit fault to insurance agents and representatives.

___ Talk to an experienced lawyer.
After many motorcycle accidents, motorcyclists may receive offers from insurance companies that may not cover all the expenses caused by the accident. Even if the initial offer sounds fair, it can still make sense for a motorcyclist to  contact an experienced local lawyer to get information about compensation specific to the case and  Wisconsin shared fault law, which means that the fault of each driver is calculated and parties are responsible for their share of the expenses. An experienced personal injury lawyer can give you advice on how to proceed to receive fair compensation.

How to Prevent Future Motorcycle Accidents

  • Wear visible motorcycling gear (including bright clothing and a helmet reflector).
  • Make sure other drivers see you when driving.
  • Don’t drink and ride.
  • Drive safely.
  • Wear safety gear when riding (including a helmet, goggles or helmet shield, long sleeve jacket, long pants, and motorcycle boots).
  • Purchase a quality helmet.
  • Pay attention to the weather before and during riding.
  • Watch the road closely for sand, potholes, and excessive gravel that can cause an accident.
  • Take a  Wisconsin motorcycle safety course.
  • Look twice at intersections, proceed once.
  • Most importantly, drive safe and enjoy the ride!


The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

Wisconsin Estate Planning Documents You Need

estate planning documents

Estate planning is a necessary part of preparing for the future. However, in the here and now, the necessity of estate planning documents may not be incredibly apparent. Unfortunately, it often takes the worst-case scenarios to bring the importance of estate planning to light.

This post outlines estate planning documents every Wisconsin resident should draft before they are needed and why it is so important to make  estate planning a top priority.

Will

This estate planning document is one of the most well-known and well-misunderstood. There are several  misconceptions surrounding wills, but its also one of the most-needed estate planning tools.

A will is a legal tool for a person to express their wishes when they cannot. Unfortunately, verbal expressions are not enough to spur action in the State of Wisconsin. For example, telling a relative they can have an heirloom does not make the item exempt from a battle among family members.

People can use a will to detail these wishes:

  • Which persons or organizations should receive assets from the estate
  • Which person is responsible for the care of minors in the household (if the other parent should also be incapacitated)
  • The person or organization that serves as the executor of the estate and is responsible for settling the estate (including distributing assets)
  • If a trust is established for asset distribution


If there is no will drafted for an estate, the distribution of assets and settling of debts is handled by other parties who may not follow the wishes of the decedent. In Wisconsin, a legal will must be drafted (ideally by an  estate planning professional) and signed by the individual as well as two witnesses. The witnesses should not be beneficiaries who receive assets as spelled out in the will or lawful heirs of the estate. It is also recommended that the will is stored in a safe location in the full knowledge of a trusted person.

Durable Power of Attorney

A Durable Power of Attorney designates a party who can make financial decisions when an estate owner is unable to do so. This is essential for situations when a person is sick or hurt, and financial matters need to be handled during this time. The lack of a Durable Power Attorney can leave family and friends struggling during what can be a very difficult time.

A Durable Power of Attorney is only applicable when a person is alive; this power ends when the person dies. The person can express in the document what financial matters can be handled. A Durable Power of Attorney can give an agent the right to purchase and sell real estate, pay for expenses, and sign legal documents on the individual’s behalf.

Healthcare Power of Attorney

A Healthcare Power of Attorney is a separate estate planning document from the Durable Power of Attorney. This estate planning document designates an agent to make healthcare decisions for another. This agent can be the same as the will executor, party named in the Durable Power of Attorney, or can be another party.

This estate planning document can be incredibly important when a person cannot make the decisions or express their wishes because of a health issue. In these cases, a agent can make decisions and carry out any wishes previously stated.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

3 Wisconsin Probate Myths Explained

Wisconsin probate

Probate is the court-supervised process in Wisconsin through which the assets from an estate are distributed. There are both Formal and Informal Probates, the formality dictates how involved the Court is in the process. This process can be lengthy and complicated or it can be short and smooth; there are steps that can be set up to ensure the process is the latter.

Unfortunately, many Wisconsin families are not aware of those steps or are held back by misconceptions about probate. An experienced estate planning lawyer can assist with the steps needed to make the time after a death easier for the family. This post can help clear up the most common misconceptions about Wisconsin probate proceedings.

Myth 1: Every estate goes into probate

Most estates are subject to probate. During the probate process, creditors have three months to file claims against the estate. There are also income taxes to file; the exact details of income tax filings depend on the estate.

However, there are some estates that do not go through the probate process. If the amount of the estate is under the  Wisconsin threshold, the estate is not subject to the probate process. Some assets in an estate may not be subject to probate.

Myth 2: There is no way to avoid probate

As discussed above, not all estates are subject to probate. Even if an estate is going through the probate process, not all assets in the estate may be part of the process. These assets may include accounts with a beneficiary designation, assets included in a trust, or property that is jointly owned. In a joint ownership, property automatically passes to the second party named in the joint ownership.

It should be noted that accounts are only excluded from probate IF the owner has specifically named beneficiaries. This is one of several estate planning steps that can make the process easier for friends and family members after a death.

revocable living trust is another way to make the distribution of assets smoother during a difficult time. Certain items of the estate are placed into a revocable living trust; the “revocable” label means the trust can be revoked at any time. There are three parties named for management and distribution of the assets: a settlor, trustee, and beneficiary (or beneficiaries). The settlor is the individual who owns the assets. The trustee manages those assets when the guarantor is alive or becomes unable to do so. The beneficiaries are the parties designated to receive those assets. A trust can be established with the assistance of an experienced estate planning lawyer. Even with a trust, a will should still be drafted to detail the distribution of other assets not included in the trust.

Myth 3: During probate, the court is responsible for every part of estate distribution

This common estate planning myth is partially true. Probate is a court-supervised proceeding, but the distribution of assets is executed by a personal representative usually named in the will. If a personal representative is not named in the will, the court appoints an executor.

The will can designate any party as the personal representative. The personal representative can be a friend, family member, or organization. A personal representative can also consult a lawyer to assist with the process. The personal representative is charged with compiling a list of assets, managing creditor claims, and distributing assets. Because this is a multi-step process, the probate process may take a year or more.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

Hit by a Car? What to Do if You’re Injured

hit by a car injuries

For pedestrians and drivers, being hit by a car comes with injuries and serious consequences. As wonderful as cars are, those thousands of pounds of metal can lead to substantial property damage and medical bills. The time after a car accident with these serious consequences can be incredibly traumatizing and expensive. That’s why we’ve put together a list of steps to take after being hit by a car.

Be safe

An accident scene can be chaotic. If it is possible—without injuring yourself or endangering others—don’t move after an accident. For pedestrians, this advice can also be helpful in preventing any further injuries and can also prove that the pedestrian was crossing in a safe manner. Never leave the scene of the accident, which can incur serious legal consequences.

Keep statements to a minimum

After an accident, there are so many emotions and thoughts running through everyone’s heads. Even small statements, like “I shouldn’t have been crossing,” “I’m not hurt,” or “I’m so sorry” can be misconstrued and brought up later.

Contact the police

Any incident between a car and a pedestrian—or any vehicle hit by a car—is a serious matter that should involve the police. After being hit by a car, one or all parties involved should call the police.

Seek medical assistance for any injuries

The injuries from being hit by a car are not always clear after the accident. Those injuries caused by being hit by a car may include (but are not limited to):

  • Fractures,
  • Whiplash,
  • Head injuries,
  • Wounds,
  • Internal injuries

Often, symptoms of injuries from being hit by a car may not show up immediately and may take time to appear. For this reason, pedestrians and drivers should always get medical care as soon as they suspect any issues.

Keep all paperwork (for possibly months and years)

Being hit by a car comes with a lot of paperwork, such as police reports, insurance paperwork, and medical bills. While it may seem inconvenient to do so, pedestrians and drivers should collect and store all those documents for future reference. Even receipts for medications can be helpful when seeking compensation for injuries after being hit by a car. In addition to medical bills, pedestrians can also receive compensation for lost wages and pain and suffering. (Talk to a personal injury lawyer for more information about compensation after being hit by a car.)

Wait to talk to the insurance company

Just as statements at the scene of a car accident can be misconstrued, so can statements made to the insurance company. Some insurance companies also may make low-ball offers that don’t completely cover all the expenses incurred from being hit by a car. Instead, if there are significant expenses, consult a personal injury lawyer before talking to the insurance company. An experienced personal injury lawyer can give you advice on how to proceed to receive fair compensation.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.

When to Contact & Hire a Personal Injury Lawyer

when to hire a personal injury lawyers

Personal injury lawyers are more than just car accident lawyers. In fact, it is wise to contact and hire a personal injury lawyers for any case involving an injury resulting from a negligent or reckless action of another party. This can be any kind of incident (see list of possible personal injury cases) where someone is injured and needs compensation to cover any expenses that arise—and may continue to arise—related to the injury.

All personal injury accident victims should consult with an experienced personal injury lawyer.

What kind of cases do personal injury lawyers handle?

Most people think of personal injury lawyers after a car accident. The list of personal injury cases could include, but is not limited to:

  • Bicycle Accidents
  • Car, Truck and Automobile Accidents
  • Motorcycle Accidents
  • Boat and Personal Watercraft Accidents
  • Bus, Semi-Truck and Other Vehicle Accidents
  • Slip and Fall Accidents
  • Dog Bites and Animal Attacks
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Spinal Cord Injury
  • Pedestrian Accidents
  • Farm Accidents
  • Construction Accidents
  • Workplace Accidents and Worker’s Compensation
  • Defective Products and Product Liability
  • Wrongful Death
  • Insurance Claims
  • Nursing Home Abuse
  • Broken Bones
  • Homeowner Liability
  • Medical Malpractice

An experienced personal injury lawyer is an important asset and guide when navigating through the process. The right personal injury lawyer can answer questions and advocate for the highest and fairest amount of compensation.

The materials on this website are provided for informational purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. These materials are intended, but not promised or guaranteed to be current, complete, or up-to-date and should in no way be taken as an indication of future results. Transmission of the information is not intended to create, and the receipt does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship between sender and receiver. You should not act or rely on any information contained in this website without first seeking the advice of an attorney.